Holiday Depression

For many people, the holidays are the happiest times of the year. However, for some, it’s the complete opposite. The hustle and the bustle during the holiday season can cause stress, anxiety, and loneliness.

Why We Get Depressed During the Holidays

There are several reasons why depression is common during the holidays. These include:

  • Social isolation
    Social isolation is the most common reason for the holiday blues. This is usually the case for those who have a small social circle or those with little to no opportunities for social interaction. It’s easy for these people to view those who are with their family or friends as happier than they are. They may even ask themselves, “why can’t that be me?”
  • Unrealistic expectations
    The excessive commercialization of the holidays and the perfect holiday depicted by many TV shows and ads can make some people set unrealistic expectations for the season. And when these expectations are not met, they end up disappointed and depressed.
  • Never-ending to-do list
    The holiday season can create fear and a heightened pressure on those who are trying to do so much. Coupled with perfectionism, those with a never-ending to-do list can easily feel defeated even with the slightest mistake in doing something. They feel like they already disappointed the people around them and that they’re always bound for failure.

What to Do

If you’re already starting to feel the holiday blues, then know that there are ways to help in alleviating it.

  1. Try to reduce your stress
    Try to reduce your stress. You can do this by limiting your commitments and family activities, setting limits on your holiday purchases, and setting realistic expectations for the season.
  2. Continue your healthy practices
    Eating healthy and engaging in regular physical activity are shown to help in reducing your risk of mood problems.
  3. Join support groups
    Seeking help from a counselor or support group can provide you with social support during this vulnerable time of the year.

 

If depression is something you experience outside of the holiday season, it may be time to think about other options. NeurOasis specializes in TMS therapy. TMS therapy, or transcranial magnetic stimulation, is a safe, effective, and noninvasive way of managing the symptoms of depression, anxiety and other mood disorders.

Contact us to find out how we can help you cope with the holiday depression

Depression in Women

About 15 million people in the U.S. suffer from depression each year.

Research has shown that women are twice as likely to develop depression than men, and it’s estimated that about 1 in 4 women will have an episode of major depression at some point in her life.

Types of Depression That Affect Women

There are different types of depression that affect women. The most common are: major depression, postpartum depression, and persistent depressive disorder.

Major Depression

Major depression is a severe form of depression. In this type of depression, women lose their ability to find pleasure in things and activities that they used to find enjoyable. This greatly affects the way they work, function in day-to-day life, and deal with others.

Postpartum Depression

Also known as the “baby blues,” postpartum depression is a type of depression that occurs in women after the birth of their baby. Symptoms of postpartum depression usually occur in months following birth.

Persistent Depressive Disorder

A milder form of depression, persistent depressive disorder is characterized by an extended depressed mood. This can last for two years or more.

The Risk Factors

It is still unclear why the gender gap in depression exists in. However, researchers suspect that some of it can be brought on by genes, hormones, and stress.

Genes

Studies suggest that heredity accounts for 40 percent of the cases of depression. Researchers found out though that certain genetic mutations that are linked to severe depression only occur in women.

Hormones

For years, researchers have suspected that fluctuations in women’s hormones, specifically with estrogen, contribute to a woman’s greater vulnerability to depression.

Stress

Women are more likely than men to become depressed when exposed to certain stressful events. Being the primary caregiver and financial inequality can also contribute to the development of depression in women.

Treating Depression in Women

Depression in women is treated the same way as depression in men. It is most commonly treated through medications, therapy, or a combination of the two.

If you’ve tried everything with no results from traditional treatment methods, NeurOasis wants to help you get your life back. We specialize in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. TMS Therapy is a safe and FDA-approved treatment for major depression.

Make an appointment online or call (520) 338-2557 to get your free consultation today.

Parkinson’s Disease & Depression

Depression is common in patients with Parkinson’s disease. It’s a neurodegenerative disorder that affects the dopamine-producing neurons.

Dopamine plays different roles in the brain, which include those pertaining to motor function, arousal, motivation, reward, and some executive functions.

The exact cause of Parkinson’s disease is still unknown. While it’s not fatal, the disease can be debilitating. It can cause tremors (mainly at rest), slow movement, gait and balance problems, limb rigidity, and depression.

Depression in Parkinson’s Disease

Depression in Parkinson’s disease is an array of symptoms that may occur during the early stage of the disease. Oftentimes, it occurs years before other symptoms of Parkinson’s show up.

Aside from having a negative impact on one’s quality of life, depression can also worsen other symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Some of the common symptoms associated with Parkinson’s related depression includes:

  • Changes in appetite
  • Difficulty in concentrating
  • Low energy level
  • Low self-esteem
  • Depressed mood
  • Inability to find pleasure in things you used to enjoy
  • Suicidal thoughts

Treating Depression in Parkinson’s Disease

Depression in Parkinson’s disease is usually managed through a combination of medication and psychological therapy. There are alternative treatments though if none of these traditional treatment methods provide results. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is one of these alternative treatment methods.

TMS is a form of therapy that uses magnetic pulses to stimulate certain areas of the brain. It’s a safe and FDA-approved treatment for major depression.

NeurOasis is dedicated to treating patients with conditions like depression who have not found improvements in their symptoms through traditional methods.

To find out more how we can help you through TMS, you can schedule a free consultation with us today.

TMS Therapy – A New Treatment for Depression

Major depressive disorder (MDD) remains to be the leading cause of disability in the U.S. for ages 15 to 44. Although it can affect both men and women, MDD affects more women than men.

About Major Depressive Disorder

Also known as clinical depression, major depressive disorder is a mood disorder characterized by the constant feeling of hopelessness and despair. A person with MDD suffers from intense and persistent feelings of sadness for an extended period of time.

Major depression can affect different areas of one’s life including work, study, and even relationships. It can also affect physical functions, such as sleep and appetite. Those with MDD often lose interest in activities they used to enjoy and have difficulty performing day-to-day activities.

Antidepressants are a popular choice of treatment for depression. These are a group of drugs that are designed to help correct chemical imbalances in the brain and potentially reduce the symptoms of depression.

TMS Therapy for Depression

Antidepressants are common for the treatment of depression, but some studies suggest that they don’t provide results in all cases. The effectiveness of antidepressants depends largely on the severity of the depression.

If antidepressants are no longer helping, it may be time for you to consider other treatment options.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation, or TMS therapy, is a noninvasive procedure that uses a magnetic field to stimulate certain areas of the brain. It is a FDA-approved treatment for major depressive disorder, as well as other mood disorders.

At NeurOasis in Tucson, we are committed to helping our clients manage their depression through innovative technology. Our healthcare specialists have over 30 years of combined experience in mental health, and understand the challenges faced when living with a mental health disorder.

To learn more about TMS therapy at NeurOasis, contact us online or call 520-338-2557 today.

TMS: Fighting Depression by Targeting the Brain’s Wiring

Doctors Are Now Fighting Depression by Targeting the Brain’s Wiring, Not Its Chemical Balance…

Doctors Are Now Fighting Depression by Targeting the Brain’s Wiring, Not Its Chemical Balance

Depression is becoming an epidemic that is damaging individuals, society, and the economy. Its has become the leading source of disability and of ill health in the U.S. It affects more than 15 million adults in total, including 1.5 percent of the U.S. population over the age of 18 in a given year. Depression is especially on the rise in young people, with its rates in teenage girls jumping by 37 percent over the last decade.

Although the standard treatment for depression is medication, scientists have recently discovered the physical seat of depression in the brain, as well as the particular genes that cause it. This has led to exploration in treatment for depression as a physiological issue, not a chemical one.

Ian Cook, director of the UCLA Depression Research and Clinic Program, said in a UCLA press release that they “are actually changing how the brain circuits are arranged, how they talk to each other” (with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation).

Read the full article at Futurism.com

KOMO News: Depression treatment has success when medication doesn’t

Millions of Americans suffer from depression each day, including Seattle resident Jim Broulette. According a recent KOMO News article…

Millions of Americans suffer from depression each day, including Seattle resident Jim Broulette. According a recent KOMO News article, Broulette has battled depression and anxiety for half his life, managing it with medication. Until recently, standard drug treatments have worked for him.

Following his unsuccessful response to medication, Broulette was advised to try transcranial magnetic stimulation as an alternative treatment method by the Seattle Neuropsychiatric Treatment Center. To KOMO News, Broulette reported a significant change in his life, stating that his love of people and interaction was restored.

Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2008, TMS has begun to become more available across the United States. Many patients such as Broulette have seen positive results- 60 percent of which see benefits lasting up to a year after the standard treatment course, which includes five sessions a week for a month.

Read the full article, including commentary from Steattle Neuropsychiatric Treatment Center physician, Dr. Suzanne Kerns, and learn more about TMS here.

PR Newswire: New Data Show Long-Term Benefit of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

The American Psychiatric Association released new today today regarding the benefits of NeuroStar TMS Therapy for patients with Major Depressive Disorder. As covered in this new release from PR Newswire, at the end of short-term treatment, 62 percent of patients achieved improvement in symptoms while 41 percent reported full remission. A remarkable 68 percent of patients saw improvement in symptoms along with 45 percent reaching remission after long-term treatment.

The study, which included 42 clinical practices and 307 patients, examined the long-term effectiveness of NeuroStar TMS Therapy for the course of 52 weeks after an acute treatment path.

Learn more about the study and NeuroStar TMS Therapy here.

The Washington Post Reports on New Study Regarding TMS Therapy and Depression

According to a new study from the United Kingdom, transcranial magnetic stimulation shows promising results for patients suffering from depression.

According to a new study from the United Kingdom, transcranial magnetic stimulation shows promising results for patients suffering from depression.

The study’s lead scientist, Sarina Iwabuchi, recently spoke of the findings at the European College of Neuropsychology in Amsterdam, stating:

We found that one session of TMS modifies the connectivity of large-scale brain networks, particularly the right anterior insula, which is a key area in depression.

Iwabuchi also reported signs of TMS altering the concentration of neurotransmitters. While the exact causes of depression are not fully known, much research points to abnormalities in or the disruption of neurotransmitters (serotonin, acetylcholine and catecholamines).

Learn more about how TMS can be an important non-drug therapy tool in treating depression in this article from The Washington Post.

Everyday Health: TMS Offers an Alternative to Depression Drugs and Electroconvulsive Therapy

A recent article from Everyday Health explores author Martha Rhodes’ journey with depression and her eventual path to remission through TMS therapy. After a “Medication Merry-Go-Round” and the struggle of finding effective treatment, she turned to TMS rather than electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

Transcranial magnetic stimulation has provided relief from depression symptoms for thousands of patients, and is considered a viable alternative for those who have not had success with standard depression treatments.

A recent article from Everyday Health explores author Martha Rhodes’ journey with depression and her eventual path to remission through TMS therapy. After a “Medication Merry-Go-Round” and the struggle of finding effective treatment, she turned to TMS rather than electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

Learn more about non-invasive TMS therapy and how it helped Rhodes here.