TMS treatment holds promise in autism treatment

John Elder Robison, the well-known author of look me in the eye (Broadway, 2008) and be different (Broadway, 2012) with Asperger’s Syndrome (AS), had undergone Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and has experienced some life-changing effects.

John Elder Robison, the well-known author of look me in the eye (Broadway, 2008) and be different (Broadway, 2012) with Asperger’s Syndrome (AS), had undergone Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and has experienced some life-changing effects.

Read more here on AutismDigest.com.

TMS Therapy is promising for those suffering from tinnitus

Research shows that TMS therapy might be used to augment existing tinnitus therapies and may provide an option for people who do not respond well to current management therapies.

Research shows that TMS therapy might be used to augment existing tinnitus therapies and may provide an option for people who do not respond well to current management therapies. Tinnitus, the perception of ringing or other phantom sounds in the ears or head, is perceived by 10-15 percent of the adult population.

In this study, those who received the TMS treatment experienced a 31 percent decrease in their Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI) score at the 26 week follow-up, as compared to a 7 percent decrease experienced by the placebo group.

Read the entire post from the American Academy of Audiology.

TMS may help reduce symptoms for people suffering with anorexia

According to King’s College London research published in PLOS ONE, core symptoms of anorexia nervosa, including the urge to restrict food intake and feeling fat, are reduced after just one session of a non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

According to King’s College London research published in PLOS ONE, core symptoms of anorexia nervosa, including the urge to restrict food intake and feeling fat, are reduced after just one session of a non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

From Science Daily

Dr Jessica McClelland, Post-doctoral Researcher at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King’s College London, and first author of the study, said: ‘With rTMS we targeted the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain thought to be involved in some of the self-regulation difficulties associated with anorexia. This technique alters neural activity by delivering magnetic pulses to specific regions of the brain, which feels like a gentle tapping sensation on the side of the head. 

‘We found that one session of rTMS reduced the urge to restrict food intake, levels of feeling full and levels of feeling fat, as well as encouraging more prudent decision-making. Taken together, these findings suggest that brain stimulation may reduce symptoms of anorexia by improving cognitive control over compulsive features of the disorder.’

Read the entire post here.

KOMO News: Depression treatment has success when medication doesn’t

Millions of Americans suffer from depression each day, including Seattle resident Jim Broulette. According a recent KOMO News article…

Millions of Americans suffer from depression each day, including Seattle resident Jim Broulette. According a recent KOMO News article, Broulette has battled depression and anxiety for half his life, managing it with medication. Until recently, standard drug treatments have worked for him.

Following his unsuccessful response to medication, Broulette was advised to try transcranial magnetic stimulation as an alternative treatment method by the Seattle Neuropsychiatric Treatment Center. To KOMO News, Broulette reported a significant change in his life, stating that his love of people and interaction was restored.

Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2008, TMS has begun to become more available across the United States. Many patients such as Broulette have seen positive results- 60 percent of which see benefits lasting up to a year after the standard treatment course, which includes five sessions a week for a month.

Read the full article, including commentary from Steattle Neuropsychiatric Treatment Center physician, Dr. Suzanne Kerns, and learn more about TMS here.

PR Newswire: New Data Show Long-Term Benefit of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

The American Psychiatric Association released new today today regarding the benefits of NeuroStar TMS Therapy for patients with Major Depressive Disorder. As covered in this new release from PR Newswire, at the end of short-term treatment, 62 percent of patients achieved improvement in symptoms while 41 percent reported full remission. A remarkable 68 percent of patients saw improvement in symptoms along with 45 percent reaching remission after long-term treatment.

The study, which included 42 clinical practices and 307 patients, examined the long-term effectiveness of NeuroStar TMS Therapy for the course of 52 weeks after an acute treatment path.

Learn more about the study and NeuroStar TMS Therapy here.

The Washington Post Reports on New Study Regarding TMS Therapy and Depression

According to a new study from the United Kingdom, transcranial magnetic stimulation shows promising results for patients suffering from depression.

According to a new study from the United Kingdom, transcranial magnetic stimulation shows promising results for patients suffering from depression.

The study’s lead scientist, Sarina Iwabuchi, recently spoke of the findings at the European College of Neuropsychology in Amsterdam, stating:

We found that one session of TMS modifies the connectivity of large-scale brain networks, particularly the right anterior insula, which is a key area in depression.

Iwabuchi also reported signs of TMS altering the concentration of neurotransmitters. While the exact causes of depression are not fully known, much research points to abnormalities in or the disruption of neurotransmitters (serotonin, acetylcholine and catecholamines).

Learn more about how TMS can be an important non-drug therapy tool in treating depression in this article from The Washington Post.

Everyday Health: TMS Offers an Alternative to Depression Drugs and Electroconvulsive Therapy

A recent article from Everyday Health explores author Martha Rhodes’ journey with depression and her eventual path to remission through TMS therapy. After a “Medication Merry-Go-Round” and the struggle of finding effective treatment, she turned to TMS rather than electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

Transcranial magnetic stimulation has provided relief from depression symptoms for thousands of patients, and is considered a viable alternative for those who have not had success with standard depression treatments.

A recent article from Everyday Health explores author Martha Rhodes’ journey with depression and her eventual path to remission through TMS therapy. After a “Medication Merry-Go-Round” and the struggle of finding effective treatment, she turned to TMS rather than electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

Learn more about non-invasive TMS therapy and how it helped Rhodes here.